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ocha-and-chocolate:

Dear Tracy Cozette

You wanna know what’s wrong with getting shirts done that says “Loof”? Let me tell you something from my perspective, something you might not understand since you’re not actually Asian. Now I may not be Korean, but I am half Japanese. Of course if any Korean people need to correct me please do so.

At the end of the video you said that B.A.P. fans were babying Himchan. I’m not even really a huge fan of B.A.P. but let me tell you something as an Asian American with an immigrant Asian mother. This is not about babying Himchan, it’s about respecting non-Westerners in the same way you would respect a Westerner, or in your case another American. You need to understand that you as a Westerner are not put up to the same standards as non-Westereners are when it comes to speaking another language. You can mess up and hey maybe some people will make fun of your accent or whatever but you will still be more or less accepted in the end. It doesn’t work that way for Asian people.

Yes, you know the struggle of learning how to speak another language, but it’s different for you because whatever language you’re learning is not considered a “powerful language” nor was it actually mandatory for you to learn Korean. English is considered that, quite obviously by how a lot of countries have made English mandatory in schools despite it not entirely making sense to considering that their native language is not English, and therefore there’s way more pressure on being able to pronounce and speak it well than there would be for other languages.

It really does not matter if you speak the Korean language or that you got a degree in East Asian studies. Naming all these places you’ve been to in Korea and all these connections you have don’t support your argument at all either. At the end of the day, you’re not Korean nor are you Asian. You have no right to speak for Korean people or for Asian people on this subject at all, which you are doing by the way, because you do not understand the discrimination Western Asian people have to face, constantly have to prove to people that yes they CAN speak English or whatever the native language is in their country, and that Asian people speaking English as a second language must face, knowing that they are constantly being judged for the way they speak by Westerners, much more harshly so than let’s say a white European speaking English as a second language would.

Wearing those shirts was not only wrong but flat out insulting. You claim to have not been trying to make fun of Himchan’s English, but right around 3:43 you completely admit that yes, you do make fun of the fact that he cannot pronounce roof right. So what was all this shit you were saying about how you didn’t like it when people were making fun of him now?

You also stated that part of embracing the word “loof” has not only to do with encouraging Himchan but also that it also has to do with breaking down cultural and language barriers. Encouraging him to do what? Be embarrassed? How is making fun of someone’s English breaking down any barriers? What you are doing literally shows no signs of being more accepting and open of other people’s cultures and languages. If anything you’re making fun of the fact that he can’t completely adapt to YOUR language. When you do this, whether you are conscious of it or not, you are looking DOWN on that person for not being able to fit in to the standards of your country.

No, I’m not gonna personally email this to you because I need the kpop fandom and everyone in general to understand what is wrong with making fun of someone’s English. This is a serious issue that happens constantly not just in a kpop context, but for Asian and Western Asian people among other foreigners coming to Western countries everyday. People have a right to know about what you and unfortunately many others have been doing.

It does not matter how much you paid for the shirts or how much you love B.A.P. What you did was wrong and you need to recognize the mistakes that you’ve made and apologize, not just to Himchan, but to everyone , especially people who are not Western or visibly Western, that have struggled with English as a second language and have faced the discrimination that has come along with it, something you will never understand.

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elloellenoh:

cindypon:

itsameriie:

#tbt Me and Mommy in our hanboks in Seoul, Korea. #love

<3

Oh my gosh what a beautiful hanbok!!! You both look so lovely!

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cross-connect:

Caryn Drexl born 1980, is a self-taught conceptual and portrait photographer based in north/central Florida, USA. She has a unique approach to taking female portraits. Her style is like the photographic version of Edgar Allan Poe, with its imaginative details and vague sense of discomfort. She openly admits that “Everything I know I learned through trial and error or the internet.” Although she loves the look of film, and does own some vintage cameras, for practicality she prefers working with digital images. And no big cameras either, “I have girly little hands and a dislike for big heavy cameras that’ll break my wrist or my neck, so the littler ones suit me well.”

You can find more of Caryn’s mysteries in her Etsy shop, CarynDrexl.

Tumblr I Facebook  I Twitter I 500px I Google+ I deviantART

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theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

i’m watching the exo comeback showcase because someone subbed it and yep, history is still my jam

as much as i’m oddly attached to mama and the superpower stuff, i will always kinda feel like they should have promoted history instead

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dailyexo:

Kai - 140415 Comeback Showcase - 20/34

Credit: First Love. (컴백 쇼케이스)

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ilikeprettyclothes:

Some of the items I am currently loving from ASOS Curve!

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Messages faked

lawrence43566:

South Korean police say that text messages and kaokao talk messages claiming to be from survivors inside the ferry had been faked.
The messages surfaced at around 10 pm on Wednesday and quickly spread through twitter and Facebook.

POLICE say that those behind the messages hurt the families of the missing and caused confusion in the search efforts, will face criminal charges including defamation and obstruction of justice by deception.